Hobby Horse

Ride a cock horse to Banbury Cross
To see a fine lady upon a white horse
With rings on her fingers and bells on her toes
She shall have music wherever she goes
humansofnewyork:

"The thing we need most is security. Without security, nothing works. We are only out here playing chess because right now, in this place, we have a little bit of security. But that’s just for right now— just this moment. In this country things have never been secure for long. In America, there is always security. And that’s why America works."(Juba, South Sudan)

humansofnewyork:

"The thing we need most is security. Without security, nothing works. We are only out here playing chess because right now, in this place, we have a little bit of security. But that’s just for right now— just this moment. In this country things have never been secure for long. In America, there is always security. And that’s why America works."

(Juba, South Sudan)

thegetty:

Trois crayons, or three-colored chalk, was a technique Watteau may have learned by studying drawings by Peter Paul Rubens.

Made to study the movement of this woman’s costume, Watteau kept hundreds of drawings together as a reference for any composition. The central figure appears in Embarkation for Cythera at the Louvre. 

Fashion Fridays explores art, history, and costume inspired by the exhibition Rococo to Revolution #NowOnView

Studies of Three Women, about 1716-1717, Jean-Antoine Watteau. J. Paul Getty Museum.

(via brighid45)

The best way out is always through.

—Robert Frost (via lazyyogi)

ursulavernon:

cigartop:

"Lots of artists can fill their work with aching homosexual tension, but no one else can make the impending sodomy look quite as classy and exquisitely dressed as Leyendecker can.” - source

Before Rockwell, a Gay Artist Defined the Perfect American Male
"Nobody had to tell J.C. Leyendecker that sex sells. Before the conservative backlash of the mid-20th century, the American public celebrated his images of sleek muscle-men, whose glistening homo-eroticism adorned endless magazine covers. Yet Leyendecker’s name is almost forgotten, whitewashed over by Norman Rockwell’s legacy of tame, small-town Americana.

"Rockwell was just an 11-year old kid when Leyendecker created the legendary “Arrow Collar Man” in 1905, used to advertise the clothing company’s miraculous detachable collars. One of America’s first recognizable sex symbols, this icon of masculinity was defined by his poise and perfection, whether on the sports field or at the dinner table. Like the Gibson Girl, the Arrow Collar Man developed a singular identity, equal parts jock and dandy, who supposedly received more fan letters than silent film heartthrob Rudolph Valentino. To top things off, Leyendecker’s men were often modeled after his lover and lifetime companion, Charles Beach, making their secret romance a front-page feature across the U.S."

- continue reading this article by Hunter Oatman-Stanford in Collectors Weekly.

Additional reading can be found at one of my favorite sites: Gay Influence.

J.C. Leyendecker in 1895.

Love the rendering on the first one!

ancientart:

Etruscan strainers at the MET.

All the shown examples date to the 6th-5th centuries BCE and are made of bronze. Strainers were were used at symposiums (drinking parties) to strain the wine or additives mixed into it.

The strainer shown in the first image is one of the most elaborate, and best-preserved, Etruscan strainer handles found to date. The MET provides the following description of this artefact:

The artist has skillfully presented a complex subject on a very small scale in the openwork square just below the handle’s attachment point. Two nude boxers appear to have just finished a bout in which one man has been knocked to his knees. Their trainer or referee holds his arms up to indicate the end of the round. On the underside of the attachment point is a delicately modeled doe lying on a wave-crest border. The handle’s base depicts a bearded male figure with fish-like legs that terminate in bearded snake heads. The strange legs form a perfect circular opening that allowed the patera to be hung when not in use. The sea monster, almost like a merman, may have been intended to ward off evil.

Courtesy of & currently located at the Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York, via their online collections12.160.834.11.814.105.365.11.122.139.1711.212.2.

(via brighid45)

d-pi:

azertip:

Eduard Thöny

Go to school. Simplicissimus is perfect for grave robbing. Paul Bruno is another favorite of mine and a mainstay in this publication.

(via diplopic)